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Sun Jun 10, 2007 3:28 am


Hi, I found this site and it intrigued me, because I feel that I have something in common with y'all, although I have not yet read all the posts, but I will be getting to them.

In fact, I spent most of the day in bed, under the covers, scared to death that my drivers license would be taken away. Usually, every 4 years our drivers licenses are mailed to us every 4 years and I had not seen an optomotrist (O) for 10 years. I am now 56, soon to be 57. This time, we had to go to the DMV in person to renew our licenses, and although I see perfectly driving, and never had a moving violation; when I did my own eye test by covering both eyes, when I covered my right eye, the little eye chart became blurry, so I began to wonder what they were going to do.

Ever since I was 12, my (O) told me I had a lazy eye (my right (R) eye) but that my left eye had perfect vision (40/20). He recommended a patch to wear on my left eye to strengthen the muscles of my right eye. I did for awhile, but at that age, people made fun of you and self esteem was SO important. The (O) said that it wasn't crucial, but that in time my (R) eye would become lazier and that my left (L) eye would compensate for any increasing laziness in my right.

I went to the O 10 years ago...just to see how my eyes have changed but it wasn't because I was having any problems seeing, just reading, but I could still read so he gave me some glasses, and said, your eyes are still good and it's up to me whether to wear the prescription glasses or not.

Wow - time flies and it brings me to today. The only glasses I ever had to start putting on were those reading glasses they have all over the place, especially the fine print. Not much of a problem. So I'm at the DMV, and before I got to the clerk, I covered my right eye and the letters were crystal clear (20/40); they hadn't changed in all this time, BUT when I covered my left eye, ALL of the letters became blurry and I thought, maybe she'd skip the eye test or maybe I could move my hand over a bit so that I could see a little out of my left eye. I got really nervous. I took the test, and of course I failed because my right eye was 20/100 and they sort of didn't know what to do with me.

I explained to them what my O said; that my good eye is compensating for my right eye and that my vision was OK for driving, but according to DMV rules, the numbers just weren't right for my right eye. Even if I hold a piece of paper with fine print arms length, I could read what it says. I also have an astigmatism which I forgot to mention. To summarize, I see fine, just not that chart with my right eye. So they told me to go to my optomotrist. I don't have one but my Dr. will recommend one, and I have no idea what he's going to do. Maybe make a lens so I could see the letters on my right side? if he could do that? and leave the left lens alone? Then I heard them talking and them saying I might have to take a driving test? After 40 years of driving? If I do, I'd like to take one w/o any corrective lenses.

So, I'm depressed, very depressed about what's going to happen. I imagine the worst, they'll take away my drivers license and I commute and need it to function in my life. Or maybe I can get a letter from the O about my eyes, and that the left eye compensates for my right and is not a hindrance to my driving. It really isn't.

I wrote so much. I'll stop here. I know you're in the UK and I'm in the USA, but does anyone know how to get around this IF they decide no go. I'm really scared to death.

Thanks for listening.

Trudi :(



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Sun Jun 10, 2007 3:58 am

 
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One Eyed Leprachaun
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Hi Trudy; this is my 1st time and you're my first reply!! YEAH!!
From what I've been reading on this site in the USA they are very flexible with licences; I'm sure if a person with one eye removed can still drive you will be ok with your glasses; Good luck; Vera (Melbourne; Australia



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Sun Jun 10, 2007 4:08 am

 
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You just need corrected vision in your good eye, i.e., you'll have to wear prescription glasses full time when you drive.

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Sun Jun 10, 2007 6:11 am

 

Irish_In_Oz wrote:
Hi Trudy; this is my 1st time and you're my first reply!! YEAH!!
From what I've been reading on this site in the USA they are very flexible with licences; I'm sure if a person with one eye removed can still drive you will be ok with your glasses; Good luck; Vera (Melbourne; Australia


Hi Irish! You're my first reply as well. It was good hearing from you. If they DMV is so flexible with drivers licenses, why are they making me go to an optometrist. As far as glasses, I really don't need them for driving (that's what my last optomotrist said) but those eye tests with letters makes it look as if I have no vision in my right eye, when I can see far objects as if I were driving and my vision equalizes more in that situation. So, I don't have glasses, and I think that if I've been prescribed glasses, that I would have a hard time "driving"! Does that make sense. I drive better w/o the glasses. Anyway, I have this illness now called GERD, plus I have to go to court for driving w/o a seatbelt that I'm contesting (I was at a red light adjusting my cat's tail that was stuck in the zipper). So my plate is full, and today I felt awfully depressed. Another hurdle to get through.



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Sun Jun 10, 2007 6:15 am


Jay wrote:
You just need corrected vision in your good eye, i.e., you'll have to wear prescription glasses full time when you drive.


I don't understand your reply. Why would I need corrected vision in my good eye? My good eye is 20/40. And the last time I wore prescription glass when I was driving (to fix my other eye) things were blurry!

Anyway, I hope the optomotrist can explain it to them. I really do see fine when I'm driving and if they want to give me a driving test, that's fine too.



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Sun Jun 10, 2007 12:04 pm

 
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One Eyed Leprachaun
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Hi Trudie; I don't get it either; if u read the other stories from USA u can see that one-eyed people don't seem to have problems with licence; sorry about other illness; the cat stuck in zipper sounds a good story!*!*! I have a lovely cat; Ebony she is 6; and cross-eyed; good pet for one-eyed owner. cheers Vera

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Sun Jun 10, 2007 1:36 pm

 

Hi Trudi, I think Jay is saying that glasses might correct your good eye that is now 20/40 to be 20/20. If glasses can do this for you, it will not matter what the vision is in your bad eye. Sounds like you're way overdue for a check-up, I'll keep my fingers crossed. I guess you think 20/40 is pretty good but I think 20/20 should be your goal! - best wishes and let us know how your eye doctors visit goes - Amy



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Sun Jun 10, 2007 3:35 pm

 
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Evil Genius
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Welcome to the site,

I know taht in NY/NJ the law is that you have to have at least 20/40 vision in one OR both eyes to qualify for a license, This means that if he can give you a lens to compensate your good eye so you can see with it (without the bad eye) then you shoudl be fine.

Going to see your eye doctor is a good idea, I go twice a year, I don't want to take ANY chances with my good eye :)

Welcome again to the site



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Sun Jun 10, 2007 8:13 pm


Amy wrote:
Hi Trudi, I think Jay is saying that glasses might correct your good eye that is now 20/40 to be 20/20. If glasses can do this for you, it will not matter what the vision is in your bad eye. Sounds like you're way overdue for a check-up, I'll keep my fingers crossed. I guess you think 20/40 is pretty good but I think 20/20 should be your goal! - best wishes and let us know how your eye doctors visit goes - Amy


Then I don't get how they got 40/20 anyway, because they told me that I got all the letters correctly with my left eye. If that's the case, wouldn't that be 20/20? And yes, I'm long overdue for a checkup, yet I still drive with everything crystal clear with both eyes AND just my left eye. So, my left eye is still compensating for my lazy eye as the optometrists i've gone too refer it to. I would think the optomotrist would be able to do something to get my right eye to at least read some of the letters, bifocals or something, but she said as far as getting around, reading, etc. that I didn't really need glasses. I got them anyway, but never wore them, because they gave me a headache!



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Sun Jun 10, 2007 8:18 pm


mcgyver74 wrote:
Welcome to the site,

I know taht in NY/NJ the law is that you have to have at least 20/40 vision in one OR both eyes to qualify for a license, This means that if he can give you a lens to compensate your good eye so you can see with it (without the bad eye) then you shoudl be fine.

Going to see your eye doctor is a good idea, I go twice a year, I don't want to take ANY chances with my good eye :)

Welcome again to the site


Well, she did write 20/40 for my left eye (the good eye) and told me I read all the letters correctly and /100 for my right eye. It's definitely gotten a little lazier since my last visit, but my left eye compensates when my right eye is opened or closed. I guess you're smart for going for checkups. I just didn't see the need because my vision is fine.



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Mon Jun 11, 2007 9:38 am

 

I don't understand what you mean when you say that one eye compensates for the other. I have one eye and it can't possibly see as far over as the missing eye. I imagine that's why they say driving with one eye is dangerous because the field of vision is limited.



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Mon Jun 11, 2007 5:47 pm

 
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I have not posted in a LONG time, but I wanted to add my two cents to this thread. I seem to recall reading that monoculars only lose about 20% of their visible area. One does learn to compensate! In addition, with rear-view mirrors and a big rear window, most cars are equipped enough to compensate for our "shortcomings" :wink:

I've been driving since 1985 and would hardly be considered "dangerous"!

PJ-licensed in PA, NY, and CA



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Mon Jun 11, 2007 6:44 pm

 

Marmalade wrote:
I don't understand what you mean when you say that one eye compensates for the other. I have one eye and it can't possibly see as far over as the missing eye. I imagine that's why they say driving with one eye is dangerous because the field of vision is limited.


Per words of the opthalmogist, it means that my good eye compensates for the other that is lazy when driving and my field of vision is not limited when driving. I don't understand it either but that's what the doc said.



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Mon Jun 11, 2007 7:23 pm

 

Ummm.. yes we one eyers only give up about 25% but not because our good eye compensates. It's because there is normally such a large overlap with 2 eyes. The only thing your good eye can do is get into the habit of scanning back and forth more often than would be needed with 2 eyes - Amy



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Mon Jun 11, 2007 9:02 pm


Amy wrote:
Ummm.. yes we one eyers only give up about 25% but not because our good eye compensates. It's because there is normally such a large overlap with 2 eyes. The only thing your good eye can do is get into the habit of scanning back and forth more often than would be needed with 2 eyes - Amy


If you want to nit-pik, I'll give you the optomotrists name, and you can discuss it with her because she was the one who used those very words "compensate" for the bad eye, not me. Semantics are not really important here because what you said is in a way the same thing that she said. Just a different way of explaining it.



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Mon Jun 11, 2007 9:57 pm

 

PJ wrote:
I have not posted in a LONG time, but I wanted to add my two cents to this thread. I seem to recall reading that monoculars only lose about 20% of their visible area. One does learn to compensate! In addition, with rear-view mirrors and a big rear window, most cars are equipped enough to compensate for our "shortcomings" :wink:

I've been driving since 1985 and would hardly be considered "dangerous"!

PJ-licensed in PA, NY, and CA


I think you state it well. One eye does not compensate for the other but we compensate in other ways, with looking round more and using more mirrors etc etc. In the UK we aren't allowed to drive anything bigger than a car because it's deemed to be unsafe. I tend to agree with them.



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Mon Jun 11, 2007 11:19 pm

 

Didn't mean to nitpick Trudi, best wishes ironing out your license troubles!!- Amy



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Tue Jun 12, 2007 1:01 am


Amy wrote:
Didn't mean to nitpick Trudi, best wishes ironing out your license troubles!!- Amy


Thank you Amy :) ... I think it can be explained in so many different ways. Now, when I'm driving, I try to figure it out.
I see so clearly with both eyes and with one eye. I think that if the DMV doesn't understand opthalmology, in general, though, they look at it as if one eye is blurred by looking at little letters on a chart, that it can affect ones driving. It probably does, but I'm not aware of it, and I wish they would have asked me to take a driving test on the spot, freeway and all to see that. I tried to be aware of any impairments, but I didn't. I remember a Dr. explaining it to me along time ago that it will be this way all my life, this lazy eye, and if my left eye remains strong, it won't have much affect upon my vision while driving. It seems funny that I have to drive 45 minutes to get my eye test which is set up for 6/26, and my birthday is 6/27. If a lens can be made to see the chart and It says I have to wear corrective lenses on my drivers license, it would probably have to be bifocals. It would be better and easier for me for a Dr. to explain technically why my driving skills are not impaired because of the lazy eye.

Then I got to thinking, when they make you read the chart with both eyes open, I had 20/40 vision, so that's usually how I drive with both eyes open. If my depth perception is altered, I'm not aware of it. And when it comes to parking, friends are amazed at how I get in and out of those tight spots! I dont' know if that has anything to do with it.

We'll see...I have alot on my plate right now. Paid off (instead of contesting a driving w/o a seatbelt citation which has gone up to $95! Now I'm done with it instead of another appointment in court. If you did not see it in one of the posts, my cats tail was caught in the zipper of the carrier, so at a red light I stopped, unbuckled, and put him out of his agony. Then I rebuckled. But I have no evidence, altho the officer said to me that he probably wouldn't show up in court! would you believe that? And he said he was sorry he had to give me that ticket.

Was also diagnosed with "GERD" and I have so many tests to take, again, 45 minutes away. Today I slept with my kitties because I was so tense. I will keep you posted. Thanks. I don't know what I would do if somebody said you can't drive, but i'd definitely fight it, somehow.

Still, it's hanging over my head.



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Wed Jun 13, 2007 11:07 pm

 

Welcome Trudijane
Before i lost my left eye in an accident I used to have a "lazy" right eye. What was happening was that I used to look more out of my left eye than I did my right eye, therefore I think where the "compensating" comes in is what I have perhaps just described. The human body simply compensates for any inadequacies we have.
Cheers
Barry :)



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Wed Jun 13, 2007 11:48 pm


Bazza wrote:
Welcome Trudijane
Before i lost my left eye in an accident I used to have a "lazy" right eye. What was happening was that I used to look more out of my left eye than I did my right eye, therefore I think where the "compensating" comes in is what I have perhaps just described. The human body simply compensates for any inadequacies we have.
Cheers
Barry :)


Exactly Barry. Just that if an opthalmologist detects it when you are 12, there are actually muscles in the lazy eye that can strengthen in time. But at 12, who wants to wear a patch, especially when I had good vision as far as I knew, was a good athlete in all sports (still am). When you are tested to look at the letters, they test both eyes, and each eye. The only eye that was blurry was the right eye. So, it goes to show you that with both eyes open, it's as if I have 20/20 vision. I had the same lazy eye last time I went for an overdue exam, so if I could see perfectly with both and 1 eye, why are they making me go back to the O and scare the life out of me. Today I drove an hour, and I thought, I'd really like to take a driving test if they have any doubts. :evil:



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