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Thu Oct 12, 2017 8:26 pm

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I'm at my wit's end. It's been a year and three months since losing nearly all the vision in my right eye due to NAION. I've been plagued with vertigo and pain the entire time. I can't get used to what is constantly changing. Today has been worse than any prior. I now have a good bit of vision but nothing useful. I can see my hand in front of my face (barely) but no finger count. That is not supposed to happen so long after a NAION. According to the eye doctor, the first few weeks I should have recovered some of the vision but after that, it's permanent. Also, I didn't know there was a name for it until recently, but Charles Bonnet syndrome is no fun either. No doctor I have seen will do anything but offer pain pills and collect their fee. No thanks. Does anyone have suggestions for getting some relief?

LS

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Thu Oct 12, 2017 9:11 pm

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I am so sorry that this is happening to you.

First, the pain - is it headaches or eye pain? Are you getting treatment for it? (Drugs)

Next, the vertigo - I had that as I went through losing my eye. It was part of the migraine headaches, I got terrible vertigo and nausea with them. Once the migraines were treated, the vertigo and nausea stopped. Does that sound like it might apply to you?

Then, the Charles Bonnet - that's usually a problem for elderly people who have been losing their vision due to macular degeneration. They start seeing tiny people. Is that what's happening to you?

There is another visual disturbance - phantom eye syndrome, visual type. It usually comes after you've lost your eye, but there are so few people who have it, very little is known about it. What we have in common is extreme pain for a long time before losing the eye. Then when the eye is gone, we see something like static on old TVs or a dirty window that we're looking through. The missing eye sees the same whether open or closed. I've found Klonopin and Fycompa helpful but the Fycompa costs a fortune.

My suggestions - if you have pain, seek treatment for it. If it's migraines, pain pills won't work, you need migraine medication. The vertigo makes me think it's migraines but you have to say if it is. For the vision, try Klonopin, it's cheap.

You have to describe it in a lot more detail, especially if you're asking a doctor for help. They can't guess what it is from what you've said, any more than we can!

I hope you find some relief soon.



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Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:31 pm

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Polly wrote:
I am so sorry that this is happening to you.

First, the pain - is it headaches or eye pain? Are you getting treatment for it? (Drugs)

Next, the vertigo - I had that as I went through losing my eye. It was part of the migraine headaches, I got terrible vertigo and nausea with them. Once the migraines were treated, the vertigo and nausea stopped. Does that sound like it might apply to you?

Then, the Charles Bonnet - that's usually a problem for elderly people who have been losing their vision due to macular degeneration. They start seeing tiny people. Is that what's happening to you?

There is another visual disturbance - phantom eye syndrome, visual type. It usually comes after you've lost your eye, but there are so few people who have it, very little is known about it. What we have in common is extreme pain for a long time before losing the eye. Then when the eye is gone, we see something like static on old TVs or a dirty window that we're looking through. The missing eye sees the same whether open or closed. I've found Klonopin and Fycompa helpful but the Fycompa costs a fortune.

My suggestions - if you have pain, seek treatment for it. If it's migraines, pain pills won't work, you need migraine medication. The vertigo makes me think it's migraines but you have to say if it is. For the vision, try Klonopin, it's cheap.

You have to describe it in a lot more detail, especially if you're asking a doctor for help. They can't guess what it is from what you've said, any more than we can!

I hope you find some relief soon.


I don't have the energy left today to answer all of your questions. But your post made me think... No doctor or nurse has asked a single question about what kind of pain or where. Or what my eye sees beyond the usual counting fingers, etc that they subject me to. To answer one question, no migraines. A dull ache in the eye and other sensations. I won't accept pain meds of any kind or other powerful sedatives for reasons I'll save for non public consumption. Thank you! Your post is most helpful.

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Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:32 pm

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Get some rest and sleep. I've found that sleep is the best non-opioid pain reliever! And any time you want to talk about your treatment (your description of it makes me mad!), don't hesitate to send me a PM, if you'd rather not be public. I can certainly understand that!



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Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:05 am

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They have checked for trauma induced glaucoma, yes? My first thought with pain in the eye is either very low pressure or very high pressure. Also, as you probably aren't using the eye as much, there can be a painful/uncomfortable pulling sensation. Depending on how tired I was, it ranged from uncomfortable to painful. Its the muscles pulling the eye.

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Fri Oct 13, 2017 11:02 am

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Polly wrote:
I am so sorry that this is happening to you.

First, the pain - is it headaches or eye pain? Are you getting treatment for it? (Drugs)

Next, the vertigo - I had that as I went through losing my eye. It was part of the migraine headaches, I got terrible vertigo and nausea with them. Once the migraines were treated, the vertigo and nausea stopped. Does that sound like it might apply to you?

Then, the Charles Bonnet - that's usually a problem for elderly people who have been losing their vision due to macular degeneration. They start seeing tiny people. Is that what's happening to you?

There is another visual disturbance - phantom eye syndrome, visual type. It usually comes after you've lost your eye, but there are so few people who have it, very little is known about it. What we have in common is extreme pain for a long time before losing the eye. Then when the eye is gone, we see something like static on old TVs or a dirty window that we're looking through. The missing eye sees the same whether open or closed. I've found Klonopin and Fycompa helpful but the Fycompa costs a fortune.

My suggestions - if you have pain, seek treatment for it. If it's migraines, pain pills won't work, you need migraine medication. The vertigo makes me think it's migraines but you have to say if it is. For the vision, try Klonopin, it's cheap.

You have to describe it in a lot more detail, especially if you're asking a doctor for help. They can't guess what it is from what you've said, any more than we can!

I hope you find some relief soon.



The pain is eye pain. Usually a dull ache or the sensation similar to what I think it would feel like to have a piece of tape stuck to the eyeball. My general practitioner offered pain meds but I didn't accept and won't if I can help it. I don't think I have had what I would call phantom sight. The Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is becoming more well known and the experts say that 15% of people with vision loss have it. They suspect that many don't report it. I haven't had anything as severe as what some have, thank God. And it became less and less of an issue until recently. It's still not as much as in the beginning. The vertigo has been worse to me than anything else. I have a small sliver of light perception in my periphery that is what I suspect is causing vertigo. My right eye was dominant before I had vision issues and I don't think it wants to give up the position. After well over a year I still have eye dominance wars. As soon as I kind of get my depth perception working a little, things change and I have to start all over again. My two main issues, I believe, are eye dominance and the very small amount of "vision" I have left in the right eye. If either were resolved I honestly believe the rest of my issues would fade away and I could get used to being monocular relatively quickly.

The second doctor I saw asked if he could pray for me. And he did, right in the exam room. I appreciated his thought and effort, but that did NOT make me feel any better. The last eye Doctor I went to made the statement "You have some light/movement perception and it makes you dizzy and/or sick, I get it. But we won't do anything to harm the remaining vision and surgery is too risky. You may need that vision some day."
No, he doesn't "get it". That vision as it is, is not useful vision. I had asked if there was anything (surgery, etc) that would just get rid of the remaining vision in that eye. I then asked him if he thought it more risky than me jumping off a cliff. Maybe I overreacted, but that's the attitude I've gotten from doctors.

I apologize for the rant. Yesterday was a rough day and it's still fresh on my mind.
LS

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Fri Oct 13, 2017 3:21 pm

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The "tape on the eye" could be dry eye. Do you take Fish oil. Flax oil, vitamin E, CoQ10? And use the night time eye moisture drops.?

More later. Rant all you want, we all understand it!
Polly



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Fri Oct 13, 2017 5:16 pm

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Hi LS2729, I'm back! I'm in Colorado, two hours earlier than you, and getting up in the morning is agony (three kinds of arthritis), so I'm usually late! And then I go for a walk with my favorite dog before I do anything else!

Dominant eye problems are worse than non-dominant eye problems. It's going to be harder for you to adjust, there's no sense in sugar-coating it, that would just make you feel like a failure. I know how I felt when everyone told me about the friend who'd been blind since birth and doesn't have any problems! I'd say "Yeah, does she write programming?" That would usually stop that! So my advice to you is to come up with some replies for those "helpful" friends who are just hurting you. You're doing a good job of hurting yourself, you don't need their help.

Go to your Primary Care Physician about the vertigo and ask for a prescription for Zofran (generic). It's not addictive, not a pain-pill, not related to any of that, and it might help you. (It dissolves under your tongue and it's for nausea.) You have to go to different doctors for different things, it took me years to understand that.

I know about CBS. I've got a stack of papers saying that I have it, but I don't. Remember some years ago, everybody with an ache or pain was diagnosed with fibromyalgia? A lot of them had rheumatoid arthritis and didn't get treated for it, so now they'll never go into remission. CBS is like that, it's in style now. That doesn't mean you don't have it - describe your hallucinations, please? Then we can talk about what kind of doctor you should be going to!

Which makes me ask, what kind of doctors are you seeing? You freaked me out with your remarks about what the doctors hadn't asked you, I can only think you've been seeing the wrong doctors and for some reason, they're not sending you to the right doctors!

chemgal's question about glaucoma was right on point. Do you get your eye pressure tested every time you go to the eye doctor? And what kind of eye doctor is he/she? And what is your eye pressure? Glaucoma is a major cause of eye pain, it usually manifests as brow pain (I had plenty of it), and it's usually severe, but it can be different than normal or you might be describing it as something else because you've never had this, never known anyone who's had it, how are you supposed to recognize it or know how to describe it? But the doctors expect you to, I've never understood that!

"They" didn't want to take out my eye (it still saw some light, but nothing useful, and I was disfigured and the pain was incredible), I had to go around them to get it done. It was the right thing for me. (And it was my dominant eye, too.)

That's enough for now, okay? Give me some answers, some descriptions, and we'll try to go on... you need to get to the right doctor.



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Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:42 pm

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Hello LS2729. Migraines might be caused to dehydration, as will dry eye symptoms. So drink that water, if you keep a bottle of it by your side it will soon be gone. Suggested amount is half your weight in water! As to the vertigo, I think this is par for the course when one is struggling with sight loss. Then your brain gets used to the absence of input and it gets better. Have you tried patching your eye?
Investigate the glaucoma suggestion, do you know your eye pressure numbers? Normal range is between 9-21.
Best wishes.

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Sat Oct 14, 2017 2:33 am

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Please forgive my lag in responding everyone. I'll try to answer all the questions in one post.
My eye pressure has been checked every doctor visit. If memory serves, 15 & 16 were the pressures last visit.
I use lubricating eye drops at least four times a day as well as cleansing the eyelids twice daily. I don't currently take vitamins or oils. Each of the doctors I have seen were part of one "eye associates" or another so without digging up notes I'm not sure which was which but one optometrist an ophthalmologist and a retinal specialist or two. In all honesty, during the first weeks, they could have asked me about the pain and I just don't remember. I faced those visits alone and the memories are a blur. I do know that the only instructions I was given came straight out of the text book. Take a baby aspirin a day and keep BP under control. One did suggest the drops and eyelid clensing. Looking back at my scattered writings, it seems the main problem (excluding CBS) all along has been eye dominance. I haven't found anything online yet that deals with it.
CBS seems to come and go as my light perception in the bad eye increases and decreases. There has been no discernible pattern in the changes of light perception. A tame example was a dog that appeared beside me on my blind side as I was driving. I knew it wasn't real, but at that moment it looked real. I ignored it and after a minute or two I noticed it was gone. The most common for me is "seeing" small animals scurry away as I walk along in a lit building. I haven't had anything as bad as I've recently read about. I still felt like I was going insane though.

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Sat Oct 14, 2017 3:48 am

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No need to apologize!

I once saw a perfect Shetland pony running down my yard. Another time I saw a mountain lion climbing an Aspen tree. That one was actually a squirrel running up a tree that was much closer than I thought. I don't have CBS, it was just part of the adjustment I was going through.

I meant to read up on the NAION this afternoon but I was too sleepy, so I apologize to you for that. Hopefully I'll get to it tomorrow. But for now:
- you've been told to use lubricating drops, did anybody say "dry eye"? It's good to use the drops but if you do have dry eye, and that's causing the eye pain (dry eye is terribly painful and drives some people to suicide), you should try some fish oil, flax oil, vitamin D. The fish oil is really good for your heart, so taking it several times a day won't hurt anything UNLESS you're on other medication and you take the fish oil at the same time, so the other medication doesn't absorb. So take it away from other medications. The reason for the oils is because dry eye is often caused by dysfunction of the meibomian glands. Those are the tiny glands that line your eyelids and produce the oil that's the top layer of your tear film. If you don't have enough oil, the liquid of your tear film will dry away - and your eyes will be dry and miserable. When I started taking the oils, my dry eye became much less of a problem, the eye pain decreased greatly. When I forget to take them, I am soon reminded by the discomfort and pain!

- you don't have glaucoma and you don't have migraines. Migraines have been eliminated, is that correct? You can see some really strange stuff if you have migraines, I had them daily for several years. It was pure hell and no eye doctor said anything about my headaches, until I'd had my eye removed and told the surgeon I still had the headaches every day. He asked a couple of questions and told me to go to my PCP because I likely had migraines!

- you don't want opioid pain medications. Has anyone suggested you should go to a pain management specialist doctor? They (at least some of them, I don't know if it's all) don't prescribe opioids, they have other methods of treating the pain. Maybe you could ask your PCP for a referral to a pain management specialist? Might improve your quality of life a lot!

- the eye has no useful vision, is that correct? What is your decision, keep it or have it out?

- is it likely this NAION will affect your other eye? (Sorry, I meant to read about it.)

Keep in mind that I'm not medical. I have a degree in physics, that's about as far from medical as you can get! I'm just a person who's been through hell, trying to prompt you to find your way through it. I didn't have any support at all, it sure would have helped me to have somebody to talk it out with. So I'm just thinking I might be able to help you a little, you know?

The problem with having your dominant eye go is that you can't adjust as well/quickly as people who lose their other eye. You've probably heard about them, or even met them, the people who lose an eye and pick up and carry on in no time? They were lucky, they didn't lose the dominant eye. Also, it seems like it's easier if you lose it quickly. If the doctors keep trying to save it, it's rough - like me, four years of agony and hell, and it was the dominant. (I knew a guy who stabbed his eye with a utility knife by accident, the doctor kept trying to save it, and it took him years to recover and ruined his marriage. I don't know if it was the dominant.)

The good news is that we do eventually recover! It just takes longer, but we get there.

Have I got anything wrong? Is there anything else? I'll try to read up on NAION before you write again, I promise!



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Sat Oct 14, 2017 4:33 am

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Polly wrote:
No need to apologize!

I once saw a perfect Shetland pony running down my yard. Another time I saw a mountain lion climbing an Aspen tree. That one was actually a squirrel running up a tree that was much closer than I thought. I don't have CBS, it was just part of the adjustment I was going through.

I meant to read up on the NAION this afternoon but I was too sleepy, so I apologize to you for that. Hopefully I'll get to it tomorrow. But for now:
- you've been told to use lubricating drops, did anybody say "dry eye"? It's good to use the drops but if you do have dry eye, and that's causing the eye pain (dry eye is terribly painful and drives some people to suicide), you should try some fish oil, flax oil, vitamin D. The fish oil is really good for your heart, so taking it several times a day won't hurt anything UNLESS you're on other medication and you take the fish oil at the same time, so the other medication doesn't absorb. So take it away from other medications. The reason for the oils is because dry eye is often caused by dysfunction of the meibomian glands. Those are the tiny glands that line your eyelids and produce the oil that's the top layer of your tear film. If you don't have enough oil, the liquid of your tear film will dry away - and your eyes will be dry and miserable. When I started taking the oils, my dry eye became much less of a problem, the eye pain decreased greatly. When I forget to take them, I am soon reminded by the discomfort and pain!

- you don't have glaucoma and you don't have migraines. Migraines have been eliminated, is that correct? You can see some really strange stuff if you have migraines, I had them daily for several years. It was pure hell and no eye doctor said anything about my headaches, until I'd had my eye removed and told the surgeon I still had the headaches every day. He asked a couple of questions and told me to go to my PCP because I likely had migraines!

- you don't want opioid pain medications. Has anyone suggested you should go to a pain management specialist doctor? They (at least some of them, I don't know if it's all) don't prescribe opioids, they have other methods of treating the pain. Maybe you could ask your PCP for a referral to a pain management specialist? Might improve your quality of life a lot!

- the eye has no useful vision, is that correct? What is your decision, keep it or have it out?

- is it likely this NAION will affect your other eye? (Sorry, I meant to read about it.)

Keep in mind that I'm not medical. I have a degree in physics, that's about as far from medical as you can get! I'm just a person who's been through hell, trying to prompt you to find your way through it. I didn't have any support at all, it sure would have helped me to have somebody to talk it out with. So I'm just thinking I might be able to help you a little, you know?

The problem with having your dominant eye go is that you can't adjust as well/quickly as people who lose their other eye. You've probably heard about them, or even met them, the people who lose an eye and pick up and carry on in no time? They were lucky, they didn't lose the dominant eye. Also, it seems like it's easier if you lose it quickly. If the doctors keep trying to save it, it's rough - like me, four years of agony and hell, and it was the dominant. (I knew a guy who stabbed his eye with a utility knife by accident, the doctor kept trying to save it, and it took him years to recover and ruined his marriage. I don't know if it was the dominant.)

The good news is that we do eventually recover! It just takes longer, but we get there.

Have I got anything wrong? Is there anything else? I'll try to read up on NAION before you write again, I promise!


I do believe we are on the same page now. No migraines, no glaucoma. I would rather figure out the cause of my pain and deal with that end than treat the symptom (pain). However, a friend is really knowledgeable about herbal remedies and has been giving me some options. I agree with everything you said about eye dominance. I am a professional land surveyor and little things like alignment and depth perception are important. I patched the eye for months hoping it would give up. Helped a while but didn't last. Now I always have a patch with me because things can change quickly.
Thank you all for the replies
S

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Sat Oct 14, 2017 5:04 am

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Before I forget this, I want to mention it. In your first post you said "According to the eye doctor, the first few weeks I should have recovered some of the vision but after that, it's permanent." Then you say that it keeps changing, unless I've misunderstood this " I can't get used to what is constantly changing."

I just read that there is no further change after two months but you seem to be saying that the vision in the affected eye is always changing, is that true?

I just read, on the eyewiki page:
http://eyewiki.aao.org/Non-Arteritic_An ... thy_(NAION)
"Vision can worsen over the 2 week period following initial presentation and typically stabilizes by 2 months." You'll find that under Prognosis. In the same paragraph, it says "Progression or recurrence more than two months after initial presentation should bring the diagnosis of NAION into question and should prompt a re-evaluation."

This is important because the other eye (they call it "the fellow eye") should be evaluated for risk of NAION in people who have NAION.

I think you should consider a second opinion and a pain management specialist. I understand your wanting to know the cause of the pain, but the pain may be caused by the past pain. That doesn't sound sensible at all but it is true. If you suffer a lot of pain you can develop Chronic Pain Syndrome - the pain continues. My rheumatologist keeps telling me that I have that, I keep telling him that I don't. I have an aversion to anything that's a "syndrome"! But he's probably right (although I'll keep telling him he's not).

I'm tired, I went off track there - a pain management specialist is the person who could tell you if you have Chronic Pain Syndrome or if the pain is coming from something else, I think.

Good night, try to get some sleep, it's good for you,
Polly



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Sat Oct 14, 2017 7:34 pm

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Polly wrote:
Before I forget this, I want to mention it. In your first post you said "According to the eye doctor, the first few weeks I should have recovered some of the vision but after that, it's permanent." Then you say that it keeps changing, unless I've misunderstood this " I can't get used to what is constantly changing."

I just read that there is no further change after two months but you seem to be saying that the vision in the affected eye is always changing, is that true?

I just read, on the eyewiki page:
http://eyewiki.aao.org/Non-Arteritic_An ... thy_(NAION)
"Vision can worsen over the 2 week period following initial presentation and typically stabilizes by 2 months." You'll find that under Prognosis. In the same paragraph, it says "Progression or recurrence more than two months after initial presentation should bring the diagnosis of NAION into question and should prompt a re-evaluation."

This is important because the other eye (they call it "the fellow eye") should be evaluated for risk of NAION in people who have NAION.

I think you should consider a second opinion and a pain management specialist. I understand your wanting to know the cause of the pain, but the pain may be caused by the past pain. That doesn't sound sensible at all but it is true. If you suffer a lot of pain you can develop Chronic Pain Syndrome - the pain continues. My rheumatologist keeps telling me that I have that, I keep telling him that I don't. I have an aversion to anything that's a "syndrome"! But he's probably right (although I'll keep telling him he's not).

I'm tired, I went off track there - a pain management specialist is the person who could tell you if you have Chronic Pain Syndrome or if the pain is coming from something else, I think.

Good night, try to get some sleep, it's good for you,
Polly


I guess we still have areas that are as clear as mud. The good eye was evaluated multiple times and declared healthy. But there is still a 23% chance my good eye will fall victim to the same factors as the other. The changes I talked about are mostly differences in light perception. Even if I manage to identify a shape or object, the overall area of 'no vision' hasn't changed. I still only have two small areas that detect anything at all.
My sleep has been affected substantially. Except for rare occasions I'm unable to sleep much more than a few hours a night. I'm not sure if it has any bearing at all on my current situation, but I was born deaf in my left ear. Now with little/no sight in my right eye, I feel physically and emotionally off balance. I'm sure glad that the blind eye and deaf ear aren't on the same side.

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Sat Oct 14, 2017 8:42 pm

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That eyewiki says "Involvement of the fellow eye ranges from 15% to 24% over 5 years" - sounds like they just told you the "worst case" number. My retinal specialist loved to list the probabilities for what was going to happen to my good eye! At one point he said "I promise you that this will happen to your good eye within two years." He was referring to the vitreous detachment, which should not have caused me to lose my eye, but when he said it I naturally thought he was saying that I would lose my eye. And he always delivered all the dire statistics with a big grin. I hope your doctor has a better manner than mine did! (BTW, I have not had a vitreous detachment, 12 years later.)

Differences in light perception could be differences in light available. You have better light perception in a bright room than a dim one. And that eyewiki says that your pupils will be the same, your affected eye's pupil will react to more light just like your fellow eye does. That really doesn't make any sense, does it? But it sounds like you have the really, really rare case. This thing is so poorly understood, it would be impossible for a doctor to understand it completely.

I guess they're right, you should keep the fellow eye. But you should probably patch the affected eye constantly, to give yourself the best chance of adjustment. If you patch it for awhile, get some adjustment - enough to make you feel better - then take off the patch, you're going to lose that adjustment and go back to where you were before. So find the most comfortable patches that you can and wear them. You might even try a sleep mask, when I started using one it improved my sleep a lot! I was really surprised by that.

This one is great:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B071C ... UTF8&psc=1
It's $7 and it's just as good as the $45 one!

Ambien will put you to sleep, Silenor (Doxepin liquid can be substituted) will keep you asleep. The Silenor is commonly used by people with Parkinson's, they wake up every hour. Sleep is the most important thing for you, you need it for your attitude, your adjustment, everything. Good sleep makes a better life possible.

Have you been tested for sleep apnea? You can have a sleep study at a sleep lab (you'd sleep there overnight) or you could try this thing (if your insurance won't cover a sleep study):
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/ever ... 16405376#/
(I'm getting the Indiegogo thing, I've had horrendous sleep problems my whole life. Give it a read, at least, and write to the guy behind it if you have questions, he's really good about answering. You might find yourself on the phone with him! And that Indiegogo widget is supposed to "coach" you on your sleep, so you can sleep better without drugs. It's supposed to come out this month but they've just leased a manufacturing facility so I don't think that's realistic.)

I'll bet you're really sick of me! :)



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Sat Oct 28, 2017 4:49 am

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Age: 49
Location: Northeast Georgia

Update: I finally reached a point of discomfort that I went back to the eye doctor I liked best of the four or five I've seen in the last year. Of course, I endured all the usual tests. They still find it entertaining to check my pupils. Left eye is normal, right doesn't dilate when a light is used on it. It only dilates when a light is shined in the other eye. "Do you mind if the new girl sees this?" Yes, its happened more than once. Anyway, that's getting old. The Dr put me on steroid drops in my bad eye to relieve discomfort. Then he said "...and if you're really lucky, you might regain a small amount of vision." Pardon my loss of composure, but WTF? Why wasn't that option even mentioned before? Also, That statement goes against the diagnosis.

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Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:23 pm

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Joined: Wed Jul 31, 2013 6:22 pm
Posts: 96
Location: Colorado 8750'

When my eye was really, really messed up from everything they'd done to it, I got that "could somebody take a look?" I always thought it was incredibly inconsiderate, since the light was causing me even more pain than usual. But only once did I say no - when the surgeon wanted to let a student watch him operate on me! An optometry student, not an ophthalmology student!

The other times, I could see that whoever was getting to look at my eye had no understanding of what they were looking at and were not gaining from the experience. So what was the point?

I hope the steroids give you some relief. It sounds like you've reached the point where you understand your condition more than the doctor does.

Best wishes for better days!
Polly



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