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Sun Sep 24, 2017 1:37 am

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in a way it's fascinating, the subject matter...I'm not sure but I think phantom leg, etc. does go away after awhile, but at one point you feel pain on something that is missing...Lil

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Choroidal Melanoma Tumor that was 3/4th
in size covering my retina and detached it.
I was diagnosed on July 3, 2014 and had my
Enucleation July 9, 2014 (Female 64)



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Sun Sep 24, 2017 1:48 am

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Location: Colorado 8750'

You wouldn't say such a thing if you had it!



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Sun Sep 24, 2017 2:01 am

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I'm saying that a lot of people still don't believe it's true but now science realizes it is and who knows, maybe since it is a real thing, someone might be able to figure out a solution to such a painful, horrible syndrome...

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_____________________
Choroidal Melanoma Tumor that was 3/4th
in size covering my retina and detached it.
I was diagnosed on July 3, 2014 and had my
Enucleation July 9, 2014 (Female 64)



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Tue Sep 26, 2017 8:56 pm

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Joined: Sun Mar 26, 2017 10:11 pm
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Age: 32
Location: Moscow, Russia

Wow! What a great discussion!
Polly, it would be really great if you did some makeup teaching videos. I have troubles with it)))
Btw, today I ordered my new glassws based on your advice. :wink:
Also I've bought new foundation (like in the avatar&) and made an appointment at the hairdresser's )))))

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F/1985
Right eye: uveitis 1988, glaucoma 1993, cataract 1996, numerous surgeries 1993-2000, evisceration 7/2016, the 1st customized prothesis 2/2017, 2nd customized prothesis 06/2017.
Left eye: myopia -6.5



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Tue Sep 26, 2017 9:17 pm

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Location: Colorado 8750'

Wow, you've been busy! Good for you, there's nothing like changing your look!

Lady Mary, I could NEVER make a video. The only picture of me is the one on my ID, there are not even any pictures of me as a child. I hide behind someone else whenever a camera is out. I'm very shy and when I was disfigured and since, as I am still disfigured, people have treated me badly. And I am far too clumsy with makeup, I have never adjusted to being monocular, watching me trying to apply makeup would be a comedy. Eyeliner everywhere!! :(

I'm getting some new foundation, too! I've been wearing warm or neutral, but I have cool/pink undertones. It's no wonder sometimes I thought my face looked a little dirty!

I hope you will show us your new look!



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Sat Sep 30, 2017 9:16 pm

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Polly wrote:
Wow, you've been busy! Good for you, there's nothing like changing your look!

Lady Mary, I could NEVER make a video. The only picture of me is the one on my ID, there are not even any pictures of me as a child. I hide behind someone else whenever a camera is out. I'm very shy and when I was disfigured and since, as I am still disfigured, people have treated me badly. And I am far too clumsy with makeup, I have never adjusted to being monocular, watching me trying to apply makeup would be a comedy. Eyeliner everywhere!! :(

I'm getting some new foundation, too! I've been wearing warm or neutral, but I have cool/pink undertones. It's no wonder sometimes I thought my face looked a little dirty!

I hope you will show us your new look!


Polly,

I'm so sorry to hear how much you suffer! I hope things will change for the better for you! Me too, I am always escaping cameras. When I suggested you making a video with makeup lessons I didn't mean to hurt you. You wrote so much about makeup tips for monocular ladies and I thought you could ... well, skip it and forgive me if you can!

I will show the results of my transformation a bit later. I'm still waiting for my new eye-glasses to be ready, but I'm already wearing some makeup (some foundation, mascara and lip-gloss) and my husband says I look very nice. And I can see it myself! But I cancelled a visit to the hairdresser's. I was so faint-hearted! A bit later, not all at once.

Right now I need some encouragement - tomorrow is the beginning of the Association of European Ocularists Congress, and my ocularist invited me to listen to the participants and help her with the interpretation. I'm scared as I'm not sure that my English is good enough to discuss medical issues. Still I've learnt many new words here, lol!

The Program seems to be very interesting!!!
http://www.aeo2017.com/congress-program

_________________
F/1985
Right eye: uveitis 1988, glaucoma 1993, cataract 1996, numerous surgeries 1993-2000, evisceration 7/2016, the 1st customized prothesis 2/2017, 2nd customized prothesis 06/2017.
Left eye: myopia -6.5



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Sat Sep 30, 2017 10:52 pm

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Location: Colorado 8750'

Lady Mary,

There is no need to apologize! I love makeup and I wore it every day until I had the surgery and now I can't close my lost eye. It is very easy to put eyeliner on that eye now but it just accentuates the lack of movement! :(

You will do fine at the Congress, it does look very interesting. I wish I could hear the 12:50 talk about correcting the ptosis. There is something that my doctor did not know!

There is one American, at 17:05, he is listed as William H Freund. I am sure he is the "Hank" Freund of Freund Brothers, in Linwood, New Jersey. Here is his website: http://freundbrothers.com/
The picture looks like an nice little shop, doesn't it? Here in the US, many ocularist businesses are family businesses, handed down from one generation to the next. If a new person wants to get into the business, they usually go to work for an established ocularist and when they have learned the business, they buy an established business whose owner wants to retire (and has no family to pass it on to).

I will be thinking of you! On that day (Monday, Oct 2) I will be seeing my surgeon and I am praying that he will send me to this other doctor I have found. I hope he understands that is the way it is done, he has to telephone the other doctor. It seems there are things about how things are done here that he does not know (he has only been in Colorado since 2014).

I am sure your makeup looks lovely! It must for your husband to notice, mine never notices anything! :)

Don't worry, you will be fine at the Congress. Just remember to translate, don't get so interested that you forget to do that! And the medical/scientific terms all stay in English usually, I think. Your biggest problem with probably be the Australian, they speak their own English, you know!

Good luck!
Polly



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Tue Oct 17, 2017 5:03 am

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Location: tampa, florida, usa

Lady Mary:
The hollow above your upper eyelid is referred to as the “superior sulcus deformity”. It is not uncommon for patients who have had multiple eye surgeries, especially enucleation or evisceration surgeries, to develop this “deep” superior sulcus. A common cause after evisceration surgery is that your remaining scleral shell of your eye was not large enough to accept a large implant. Your surgeon had to put in an implant that fit your scleral shell. Therefore, the total volume of your eviscerated eye with implant is not enough to fill in your socket. (not a surgeon’s mistake ….. as was hinted in one of the posts). Another common reason is orbital fat volume loss from your multiple surgeries. This is where the orbital fat that surrounds your eye in the socket begins to shrink which reduces the volume of fat and causes the superior sulcus above your eyelid to sink in (hollow). There are a number of surgical and non-surgical procedures that can performed in order to correct this. Some have already been mentioned. Facial fillers can be injected behind your deep sulcus to fill in the hollowness. These fillers have different durations and need to be repeated every 8-24 months depending on the filler. Dermis -fat grafts were also mentioned where fat is taken from one place on your body and inserted behind your upper eyelid in the sulcus. There is always a risk that the fat in the graft shrinks as a natural process which leaves you with your hollow sulcus again. An orbital floor (enophthalmos) implant can be inserted into your orbit under your eviscerated eye which pushes your remaining “normal” orbital fat up and fills in the hollow. Another surgery (which would be my first choice) would be to enucleate your eviscerated eye and put a larger implant into your socket. The muscles from your eviscerated eye could be transferred and sewn to the new orbital implant to give movement to the socket. Essentially, you would be getting an enucleation after an evisceration. Good luck.

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oculoplastic surgeon
tampa, florida



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Tue Oct 17, 2017 5:19 pm

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Joined: Wed Jul 31, 2013 6:22 pm
Posts: 96
Location: Colorado 8750'

Dr Slonim,

I'm not Lady Mary, I'm hoping that she replies to your message as we haven't seen her for awhile and I'm worried about her (worrying is my role in life). I had the fat graft and then lost quite a bit of weight, so most of the fat is gone now. I would do anything to look normal again, is it possible to have an enucleation nine years after the evisceration and have good results? I don't suppose there is any hope of insurance (Medicare) paying for this? Are you experienced in this surgery? (I live in Colorado but would love to see Tampa!)

Thank you for the information, I am sure it will help many of us!
Polly



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Wed Oct 18, 2017 3:26 am

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Location: tampa, florida, usa

polly:
yes, it is possible to perform an enucleation 9 years after an evisceration and have great results. depending on the diagnosis code used by your surgeon, i do not see why medicare would not pay for the surgery. yes, i am very experienced in this surgery but after 30 years in private practice, i am now exclusively at the veterans hospital in tampa and only perform surgery on non-veterans through the university of south florida college of medicine on an emergency basis at our level 1 trauma center (tampa general hospital). there are plenty of qualified oculoplastic surgeons in colorado who would be happy to assist you. good luck

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oculoplastic surgeon
tampa, florida



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Wed Oct 18, 2017 4:06 am

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Thank you, Dr Slonim! I have never heard of this, and the timing is perfect - I have an appointment with an Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon in December. I had a ptosis on my lost eye, I went to a plastic surgeon to have it fixed and now the lid won't close. So I thought I'd see this other surgeon for an opinion, he looks like a young guy so I hope he's really up to date on the procedures. Something has to be done, it's getting very painful and I'm back to staying in my house. Now I know what I should ask him about - an enucleation to fix the big hollow above my eye, and maybe he could fix the lid, too. Mine isn't at all like Lady Mary's, I had a triangular hole that I could put my thumb in. The fat graft has made it a lot better, if I hadn't lost so much weight it would probably be great. But I didn't count on the eyelid being stuck open, that's really not a good look for me.

By the way, I looked you up...and thought you looked like a really young guy! This surgeon I'm going to see has his college dates listed, at least he's a lot younger than me (but not quite as young as he looks).

When I lost my eye, I already had the big hollow above it due to some years of surgeries, procedures, and treatments. The eye was removed by a Reconstructive Surgeon so I thought he would make it look better. I was wrong, he just took it out. I was in really, really bad shape and didn't ask the questions I should have asked, so it's partly my responsibility. But I think he gets some of it, he never should have left me so badly disfigured.

Thank you, maybe there's still hope for me! (Too bad I can't get a trip to Tampa, though!)



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Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:00 am

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Age: 57
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Lady Mary: That seems to be the telltale sign of someone with a prosthesis. It's hard to match it up precisely the same as your "good" eye. I've seen my hollow change after I was 55 years old. Now my hollow and my entire implant need to be all replaced. I had my surgery in 1974 and it held up!

I did have a surgery almost 3 years ago and when it was all settled down, the surgeon did add some filler to that hollow. It looked good for a few months (almost a year) and then shrunk back down. Other than that, I'm not sure what could be done. I'll let you know after I have this MAJOR surgery to replace my implant and do everything all over again.

Like Lil and others have said, wearing glasses and makeup do help + knowing that you're the one looking at yourself the most, helps. People do have differences in their eyes and it's normal. You look beautiful and I'm sure that most people don't even notice anything!

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~Chris~
F/56/Happily Married/enucleation 44 years ago- bb gun accident. Going to replace old implant due to severe changes in my socket. Hoping for the best, while thanking Dr. Slonim for his constant sage advice!



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